Dodge Challenger History

1970 Dodge Challenger R/T.
Above: 1970 Dodge Challenger R/T.

Although the Dodge Challenger was the last entrant in the pony car ranks of Detroit’s Big Three, it arrived with something its competitors didn’t have: the greatest range of powertrain choices in the industry, from the small but durable 225-cubic-inch “Slant Six” to the fearsome “Elephant Motor” the 426 HEMI.

 

And although it lasted only five model years, the Dodge Challenger became one of the most storied muscle car nameplates in automotive history, with meticulously restored and rare examples today selling for six-figure prices.

1970

The Dodge Challenger made its debut in the fall of 1969 as a 1970 model. While it shared Chrysler’s “E-body” short-deck, long-hood platform with the third-generation Plymouth Barracuda, Dodge Challenger’s wheelbase was two-inches longer, creating more interior space.

The Dodge Challenger was originally offered as a two-door hardtop or convertible, in base, SE (Special Edition), R/T (Road/Track) and T/A (Trans-Am) trim. But it was the range of powertrain choices that was truly remarkable:

  • 225-cubic-inch I-6; 145 horsepower
  • 318-cubic-inch V-8; 230 horsepower
  • 340-cubic-inch V-8; 275 horsepower
  • 340-cubic-inch V-8; 290 horsepower (Challenger T/A)
  • 383-cubic-inch V-8; 290 horsepower
  • 383-cubic-inch V-8; 330 horsepower
  • 383-cubic-inch V-8; 335 horsepower
  • 426-cubic-inch HEMI V-8; 425 horsepower
  • 440-cubic-inch V-8; 375 horsepower
  • 440-cubic-inch V-8; 390 horsepower

Driveline choices for various engines included Chrysler’s TorqueFlite automatic transmission and a three- or four-speed manual which could be equipped with a Hurst “pistol-grip” shifter. Big-block Challengers could be ordered with a heavy-duty Dana 60 differential equipped with limited-slip differential.

Even the paint schemes said “performance,” with colors including Plum Crazy and HEMI Orange, accented with “bumblebee” stripes. Customers could further customize their cars with twin-scooped hoods, “shaker” hoods, and rear deck wings.